It happened this week

This is the week that was in matters musical …

1962, “Your Heart Belongs to Me” by the Supremes debuts on the Hot 100 chart … it is the first of their eventual 47 hits …

1964, The Rolling Stones know they have arrived when they get the chance to hang out with two of their idols, Muddy Waters and Willie Dixon, while recording at Chicago’s Chess studios … the band’s name resulted from a tune by Muddy …

1965, The Jefferson Airplane, finally cleared for take-off, plays their first live show at the Matrix Club in San Francisco … the band will ink a deal with RCA before the year’s end, one of the first rock bands in the Bay Area scene to do so …

1967, Fleetwood Mac plays their first gig at the Windsor Jazz and Blues Festival (Peter Green – still the greatest British guitarist – & Mick Fleetwood pictured) a month before John McVie joins the band and despite the fact that the band’s name is derived from Mick Fleetwood’s and McVie’s last names … while performing at the Sunbury Jazz and Blues Festival in England, Jerry Lee Lewis whips the crowd into a frenzy that begins to turn violent … three rockers leave with bleeding mouths, a stage assistant loses four teeth, and thanks to a six-inch, scaffold coupling pin thrown by one of Jerry Lee’s fans through the bass drum of Andrew Steele, his band The Herd doesn’t get heard, as they do not perform (acts that had the nerve to precede Lewis are showered with pennies) … fearing a full-scale riot, officials ask Lewis to leave the stage … ” I don’t care about you all dancing on the stage,” Lewis tells his fans during the near-riot, “but some of these people do.” … a steward is knocked out when a pint beer mug thrown by an unhappy fan hits him full in the face … “The Killer” leaves the stage, and surprisingly out of character, without gunplay … on an interesting side note, The Herd’s lead guitarist is none other than a young Peter Frampton, who later splits from The Herd after a long string of no hits to form Humble Pie with Steve Marriott … recording sessions resume for the classic Love album Forever Changes … sessions that began in June were marked with bickering and personnel changes that resulted in the producer bringing in members of L.A.’s famed session stars “The Wrecking Crew” to record backing tracks for three tunes …

1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Festival is held on Max Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, New York … nearly half a million gather to celebrate “3 Days of Peace and Music” (and mud, lots of mud) and enjoy performances by a “Who’s Who” of rock and roll, including Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Janis Joplin, the Grateful Dead, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Ten Years After, and Jefferson Airplane …

1970, Jim Morrison’s trial for allegedly exposing himself during a 1969 concert begins in Miami … Morrison will be found guilty on one count of profanity and one count of indecent exposure … even though the proceedings drain the Lizard King, he will appeal the convictions …

1972, Wings gets clipped when Paul and Linda McCartney are busted for pot possession following a Wings show in Gothenburg, Sweden … the couple is fined and released …

1978, Muddy Waters plays for President Jimmy Carter at the White House … hopefully the roadies didn’t have to work for Billy Beer …

1985, ebony and ivory separate in acrimony when Michael Jackson, after seeking sage investment council from his friend Paul McCartney, purchases the ATV music catalog that includes 251 Lennon/McCartney songs at auction for $47.5 million … McCartney and Yoko Ono attempt to purchase the songs only to be outbid by Jackson … McCartney and Jackson’s friendship ends promptly as a result … and yes, we know that song was with Stevie Wonder and Macca, but it still works for the situation … Duran Duran singer Simon Le Bon nearly durown durowns when his yacht capsizes during a race off the coast of England …

1990, in a tragic freak accident, part of a lighting rig falls on Curtis Mayfield during a performance in Brooklyn, New York … the incident leaves Mayfield paralyzed from the neck down …

1999, The Backstreet Boys break box office records by selling all 765,000 tickets for their North American tour in just one day, taking in a cool $30 million, most of it within just a single hour … perhaps The Beachfront Boys would be a more appropriate name …

2001, Dave Matthews and wife Ashley welcome their twin daughters Stella Busina and Grace Anne into the world …

2002, in an interview with Spin magazine, Motorhead leader Lemmy says he is thinking of having his notorious facial warts removed … Lemmy adds, “Yeah, I could sell them on the internet” … thankfully he later clarifies he’s not serious about the latter statement

2003, during a radio show in Springfield, Illinois, Ted Nugent says that the people of Illinois are “spineless, apathetic, embarrassing wimps” for their lack of involvement in their state government … Nugent’s comments come from his displeasure over the state’s gun laws … or was it his ticket sales? … despite his comments, Nugent will play the Illinois State Fair later in the day … fortunately for the Motor City Madman, the audience is apparently a bunch of embarrassing wimps who are too spineless and apathetic to demand refunds …

2004, even though it pheels like the phirst time to their phans, phree-wheeling jam band Phish perphorms its phinal 2-day concert in Coventry, VT, phor a phabulous phinish to a 21-year career …

2005, a civil court judge rules that the landmark punk club CBGB’s can’t be evicted from its Bowery location … in her ruling, Judge Joan Kenney praises the club’s impact on the neighborhood, which she said was plagued by “destitution, degradation and substance abuse” when the club opened in 1973 … “CBGB has proven itself worthy of being recognized as a landmark-a rare achievement for any commercial tenant in the ever diverse and competitive real estate market of New York City.” … despite the ruling, in what can only be described as a Bowery bummer, the birthplace of punk will lose its lease a year later and consider moving to Las Vegas, much to the dismay of New York punkers and politicians alike … Eminem cancels a European tour and checks into rehab…a representative says the sojourn is for a “dependency on sleep medication” … in what could be medically termed an Eminenema, the 11-date tour cancellation cleans out the rapper to the tune of $18 million in ticket sales … a reworked version of the musical Lennon opens on Broadway following a debut in San Francisco that met with hostile reviews … the storyline is revamped into a more linear flow when critics and audiences alike are mystified by the original libretto … while on the spiritual path to remove the “five fetters” of the material plane, singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, rethinks the whole “non-attachment to material things” bit and files a suit against his former business manager, charging that Kelley Lynch ripped him off for $5 million from 1994 through 1999 while Cohen was meditating on the meaning of life in a Buddhist center … hey, removing four out of five fetters ain’t bad … besides, it’s much easier to reform when you’re rich …

2006, My Chemical Toilet (Romance) turns to a brief tryst with traditional medicine as singer Gerard Way and drummer Bob Bryar injure themselves while shooting a video and are obliged to cancel a San Diego festival date … pop singer and TV talk show host Mike Douglas dies at age 81 … for one week in 1972, John Lennon and Yoko Ono co-hosted his afternoon talk show … Douglas hit the Top 40 in 1966 with the song “The Men In My Little Girl’s Life” …

And that was the week that was.

Arrivals:

August 9: barrelhouse pianist Robert Shaw (1908), Odell Thompson (1911), Harry Mills of The Mills Brothers (1913), Bill Henderson of The Spinners (1939), jazz drummer Jack DeJohnette (1942), Rinus Gerritsen of Golden Earring (1946), Barbara Mason (1947), Cars bassist Benjamin Orr (1955), Kurtis Blow (1959), Aimee Mann (1960), Whitney Houston (1963)

August 10: Leo Fender (1909), country singer-sausage king Jimmy Dean (1928), bluegrass ace Jimmy Martin (1929), country-pop entertainer Larry Finnegan (1938), Righteous Brother Bobby Hatfield (1940), Ronnie Spector (1947), Ian Anderson (1947), Patti Austin (1948), INXS drummer John Farriss (1961), Neneh Cherry (1964), Todd Nichols of Toad The Wet Sprocket (1967), Michael Bivins of New Edition (1968), Ghost By Night bassist Ara Ajizian (1974), Aaron Kamin of The Calling (1977)

August 11: Mike Hugg of Manfred Mann (1942), David Box – Buddy Holly sound-alike, ironically died in a plane crash (1943), Jim Kale of Guess Who (1943), Eric Carmen (1949), Joe Jackson (1955), Bragi Olaffson of The Sugarcubes (1962), Charlie Sexton (1968), Chris “Mack Daddy” Kelly (1968), Ali of A Tribe Called Quest (1970), J-Boog of B2K (1985)

August 12: Percy Mayfield (1920), singer-songwriter Joe Jones (1926), Porter Wagoner (1927), Buck Owens (1929), Jennifer Warren (1941), Mark Knopfler (1949), Kid Creole (1950), Pat Metheny (1954), Suzanne Vega (1959), Roy Hay of Culture Club (1961)

August 13: jazz pianist George Shearing (1919), “Baby Boy” Robert Warren (1919), Don Ho (1930), Dave “Baby” Cortez (1938), Son Seals (1942), Dan Fogelberg (1951), Wings guitarist Jimmy McCulloch (1953), Feargal Sharkey of The Undertones (1958)

August 14: swing and jazz violinist Stuff Smith (1909), R&B singer Jackie Brenston (1927), songwriter Carol Joyner Gourley (1938), Dash Crofts of Seals and Crofts (1940), David Crosby (1941), Tim Bogart of Vanilla Fudge (1944), inventor of the slap bass, Larry Graham (1946), Slim Dunlap of The Replacements (1951), Sharon Bryant of Atlantic Star (1956), Kevin Cadogan of Third Eye Blind (1970)

August 15: blues harp player Buster Brown, born Waymon Glasco (1911), Oscar Peterson (1925), bluegrass-country singer Rose Maddox (1925), Bill Pinkney of The Drifters (1925), R&B singer Bobby Byrd (1934), singer Bobby Helms (1936), Peter York of the Spencer Davis Group (1942), songwriter Jimmy Webb (1946), Tom Johnston of The Doobie Brothers (1948), Tommy Aldridge of Black Oak Arkansas (1950), MCA of The Beastie Boys (1967)

Departures:

August 9: composer David Raskin (2004), Drowning Pool’s Dave Williams (2002), producer, Bob Herbert (1999), Jerry Garcia (1995), reggae singer Wilfred “Jackie” Edwards (1992), Brandon Mitchell, rapper with Wreckx-N-Effects (1990), Lillian Roxon, one of rock’s first music critics (1973), Joe Gilbert of Joe and Eddie (1966), Eddie Brown of Joe and Eddie (1966)

August 10: Widespread Panic guitarist Mikey Houser (2002), Ball Baker of The Five Satins (1994), New Orleans saxman Clarence Ford (1994), Ed Roberts of Ruby And The Romantics (1993), jazz singer Ernestine Allen (1992), swing bandleader Freddie Slack (1965), blues diva Lucille Bogan of “Shave ’em Dry” infamy (1948)

August 11: Mike Douglas (2006), conductor Rafael Kubelick (1996), Mel Taylor, drummer of The Ventures (1996), bandleader-pianist Sonny Thompson (1989), Percy Mayfield – one day short of his 64th birthday (1984)

August 12: Luther Allison (1997), John Cage (1992), Japanese singer Kyu Sakamoto (1985), Norman Petty, producer of Buddy Holly (1984)

August 13: John Loder, founder of the punk label Southern Records (2005), composer David Tudor (1996), blues drummer Fred Below (1988), soul singer Joe Tex, born Joseph Arrington Jr. (1982), King Curtis (1971), R&B star Joe Hinton (1968)

August 14: Johnny Duncan (2006), Esther Wong, owner of the L.A. punk venue Madame Wong’s (2005), Tony Williams, lead vocalist of The Platters (1992), Hawkwind vocalist Robert Calvert (1989), guitarist Roy Buchanan (1988)

August 15: William Herbert “Lum” York, bass player for Hank Williams (2004), singer-songwriter Joe Seneca (1996), Jamaican singer-songwriter Jackie Edwards (1996), Thomas Wayne (1971), Stick Mcghee, born Granville McGhee, most associated with his song, “Drinkin’ Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee” (1961), influential bluesman Big Bill Broonzy (1958)

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